Sherburne Lodge #95 AF & AM

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Masonic Organizations and Appendant Bodies

The Masonic family is a loosely defined grouping of those with practices and beliefs complementary to Freemasonry that also either restricts their membership to regular Freemasons in good standing or to relatives of regular Freemasons in good standing. Those organizations restricted to Freemasons are generally termed concordant while those restricted to relatives, or requiring a Freemason as sponsor, are generally termed appending. There is little agreement on the use of these terms; in the narrowest sense only the Scottish and York Rites are styled concordant while the Shrine and Grotto, not conferring degrees, would be defined as Masonic clubs.

Adding to the confusion, some Craft Grand Lodge jurisdictions will recognize those bodies by constitutionally recording that they are simply "in amity" with them. Not all Grand Lodges will recognize the same bodies. The important point is to understand that these bodies, and the various degrees they confer, are auxiliary or additional, and not superior to Craft Freemasonry.

Following are a few of the many organizations (which include youth organizations), within the family of Freemasonry. More detailed information is available on the following pages.


 

The Ancient & Accepted Scottish Rite

The Scottish Rite is one of the two largest concordant bodies of Freemasonry in which a Master Mason may proceed after he has completed the three degrees of Craft Lodge Masonry. The Scottish Rite work expands and elaborates on the lessons of the three Craft Lodge Degrees. As with Freemasonry, the Scottish Rite is not a religion, and is nondenominational, although it does require a belief in a Supreme Being.

The Scottish Rite, sometimes called the "University of Freemasonry," uses extensive dramatic plays and allegory to emphasize the messages of its degrees. A Freemason, after viewing these dramas, will eventually attain the 32nd Degree in Scottish Rite Masonry. To a non-Mason this may sound like the member is a high ranking Mason, however, this would be a misconception. The highest degree in Freemasonry is the 3rd, or Master Mason Degree. Degrees, as they relate to the Scottish Rite, indicate the level of experience that a Master Mason has attained. In the Scottish Rite, the 33rd Degree is an Honorary Degree, bestowed upon members who have given outstanding service to Freemasonry or their communities.

In the Scottish Rite, a Master Mason may become an officer of any of the four bodies — Lodge of Perfection, Rose Croix, Kadosh and Consistory.

Sherburne Lodge's Double Eagle Representative is WB Ken Martin and he may be contacted with any questions about the Scottish Rite.


 

York Rite Masonry

The York Rite is the other major concordant body of Freemasonry in which a Master Mason may proceed to supplement or amplify the Craft Degrees, affording historical background on the work and meaning of Freemasonry.

Within the York Rite, a Master Mason may become a member of three bodies — Chapter of Royal Arch Masons, Council of Royal and Select Masters, and Commandry of Knights Templar. Each Body is separate from the others and in order to join the next in line you must become a member of the previous one. Thus to join Council, one must belong to the Royal Arch and subsequently belong to Council before joining the Commandry and becoming a Knight Templar. It should also be noted that in order to belong to Commandry you must profess to be a Christian, this is the only body in all of Masonry that holds this requirement.

The York Rite takes its name from the old English city of York. It is said that Athelstan, a British king, was converted to Christianity in York and that he granted the original charter to the mason’s guilds in that city nearly a thousand years ago. The York Rite is not a religion. Like the Craft Lodge, the Chapter and the Council are based upon the building of King Solomon’s Temple. The Commandry has a theme of Christian chivalry.


Shrine - A.A.O.N.M.S.


The Shrine was formed by Dr. Walter M. Fleming and William J. Florence in 1870 in New York, NY. In 1920 the Shrine founded what has become known as the "World’s Greatest Philanthropy", Shriners Hospitals for Children. Strictly speaking, the Shrine is not an appending body, but rather a club for Freemasons.

Shriners are distinguished by an enjoyment of life in the interest of philanthropy. The approximately 660,000 member organization has a buoyant philosophy which has been expressed as "pleasure without intemperance, hospitality without rudeness and jollity without coarseness." The most noticeable symbol of the Shrine is the distinctive red fez that Shriners wear at official functions.

Shriners are Freemasons who enjoy life. They participate in parades, trips, circuses, dances, dinners, sporting events and other social occasions together. Every effort is made to be sure a Shriner has a variety of activities from which he may choose.

 


Prince Hall


History of the Most Worshipful Prince Hall Grand Lodge F & AM of Minnesota

Organized August 16, 1894

For more information on Prince Hall Freemasonry in Minnesota and how to contact the Grand Lodge please follow this link to their web site:

MW Prince Hall Grand Lodge A. &F.M. of Minnesota

March 6, 1775, Prince Hall and fourteen other free colored men were initiated as Masons in Boston by Army Lodge 441 of the Irish Registry. From this group African Lodge #1 -as organized on July, 3, 1776, by the authority from the Army Lodge. On March 2, 1784, Prince Hall petitioned the Grand Lodge of England for a Charter or Warrant. It was granted to them on September 29, 1784, naming Hall as Worshipful Master, but this Warrant did not reach Boston until April 29, 1787. African Lodge #459 was constituted by this Warrant May 6, 1787. Prince Hall granted a Dispensation to African Lodge 459 of Philadelphia on March 29, 1797; this Lodge was warranted June 24, 1797. Hiram Lodge at Providence, Rhode Island was granted a Dispensation June 10, 1797, and warranted June 25, 1797. That African Lodge #459 had authority to set up these lodges should be unquestioned, as it was customary among Masons in the 13th century for lodges to set up other lodges themselves. Especially was this the case in colonial United States. Thus, Prince Hall and his group were merely following an established precedent of their time. These three lodges met in general assembly at Masonic Hall on Water Street in Boston on June 24, 1797 and organized "African Grand Lodge'. The name was changed to 'Prince Hall Grand Lodge of Boston", July 24, 1808, and then to “Prince Hall Grand Lode of Massachusetts", December 11, 1847. Between 1810 and 1814, African Grand Lodge established Union Lodge, Laurel Lodge and Phoenix Lode in Philadelphia. On December 27, 1815, these three lodges organized the "First Independent African Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania" and among lodges warranted by this Grand Lodge were: Corinthian ,#7, True American #26 and St. John's #27; all of these lodges were warranted in 1848, in Ohio. The three Ohio lodges named above subsequently organized the Grand Lodge for the State of Ohio in Cincinnati, May 3, 1849. The first Grand Master was J. W. Stringer. The Grand Lodge of Ohio established the following lodges in Missouri during 1853 and 1854: Prince Hall #10, Lone Star #22 and McGee Alexander's in St. Louis. These three lodges withdrew from Ohio in 1965 and organized a Grand Lodge on July 6, 1865, known as the "Grand Lodge of Missouri'. The Ohio Grand Lodge established the following lodges in Illinois: North Star #12, Chicago; G. T. Watson #16, Alton; Central #19, Springfield and Freemont #30, Shawneetown. On February 15, 1967, delegates from North Star, G. T. Watson and Central Lodges met in convention at Springfield, Illinois, to organize the "Prince Hall Grand Lodge of Illinois". After the warrants and constitutions were returned to the Ohio Grand Lodge and other procedures were consummated requisite to establishing their Grand Lode, the convention adjourned to meet May 6, 1867 at Springfield to hold the first annual communication. Brother B. R. Rogers was elected the first Grand Master. About 1875, the Grand Lodge of Missouri established the following lodges in Iowa: York #8, North Star #31, Des Moines; Sumner #41, Burlington; Golden Star #480, Ottumwa; and John G. Jones #91, Council Bluffs. The lodges operated under Missouri's jurisdiction until 1881 when they formed 'African Grand Lodge of Iowa." "Hiram Grand Lodge of Iowa" was formed August 26, 1884 by the following lodges, who acknowledged allegiance to the Grand Lodge of Missouri: Clark #6, Davenport; North Star #131, Des Moines; Sims #50, Oskaloosa; Star #45 1, Keokuk; Reed #79, Red Oak; Mount Olive #486, Cedar Rapids and Cedar Grove LJD, Cedar Grove. Confusion, strife and bitter feelings reigned during the struggle for Masonic supremacy by the two rival Grand bodies, African, under Grand Master George H. Clagget, and Hiram, under Grand Master Alexander Clark; they finally met in Des Moines in 1887 in convention and consolidated as the "Most Worshipful United Grand Lodge of Iowa, AF & AM", Brother George H. Clagget was the first Grand Master. This consolidation, therefore, brought peace, harmony and love to the troubled Masonic waters of this great state.

The various lodges in Minnesota previous to the organization of the Grand Lodge of Minnesota were instituted by the Prince Hall affiliated Grand Lodges of Missouri, Illinois and Iowa. Thus, we have attempted to point out in the brief Masonic histories of our Mother Jurisdictions, herein before presented, that Masonry among men of color in Minnesota reveals an unquestionable, unbroken descent from African Lodge #459 of Boston, Massachusetts. The Minnesota Prince Hall Grand Lodge was organized on August 16, 1894. The names of the Lodges participating in this organization were at that time: Pioneer Lodge #12 of St. Paul; J. K. Hilyard Lodge #6 of Minneapolis; Minnesota Lodge #13 of St. Paul; Perfect Ashlar Lodge #148 of St. Paul; W. H. Stevens Lodge #41 of St. Paul and Doric Lodge #45 of Duluth. The first Grand Master was T. H. Lyles, the first Grand Secretary was James Woodfork and the first Grand Treasurer was Joseph Adams.

To protect the corporate name of the Minnesota Grand Lodge from encroachment by spurious, illegal bodies of masons, the Grand Lodge in special session on June 2, 1950 voted to amend the Articles of Incorporation by changing the name to the "Most Worshipful Prince Hall Grand Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Minnesota and its Jurisdiction.' The amended incorporation papers were filed in the office of the Secretary of the State of Minnesota on June 8, 1950. The Most Worshipful Prince Hall Grand Lode of Minnesota claims sovereignty over the states of Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and the provinces of Manitoba and Alberta, Canada.


Grotto, M.O.V.P.E.R.


The Mystic Order of Veiled Prophets of the Enchanted Realm, whose subordinate bodies are the Grottoes, is an organization by and for Master Masons. While in no way connected with Masonry proper, its membership is restricted absolutely and exclusively to Master Masons in good standing. Although it is primarily an organization for good wholesome fun and frolic, it also has its serious side. Its slogan is GOOD FELLOWSHIP, and in contact with our fellowman, this principle is exemplified to a marked degree.

For some years prior to 1889, several members of Hamilton Lodge No. 120, F.& A.M., at Hamilton, New York, sought relaxation from the sterner duties of life by holding occasional informal meetings for fun and good fellowship. The chief spirit in the fun was LeRoy Fairchild, and in the summer of 1889, he and a devoted band of followers discovered the Enchanted Realm in which, upon entering with song and laughter, they and their successors have found a rich heritage. The first meeting of this organization was held on the 10th day of September, 1889. It was decided at this meeting that the membership of the organization should be confined to Master Masons in good standing.

The idea of the Order proved immediately attractive. Many distinguished Masons entered the Enchanted Realm and returned pleased and charmed by its brilliancy. The Order could no longer be confined to one locality and in response to imperative requests that were not to be denied, on the 13th of June, 1890, the "F.D.C." duly founded and established the Supreme Council of the Mystic Order of Veiled Prophets of the Enchanted Realm.

It is a social organization for the Master Mason and all such are welcome to our Enchanted Realm. It encourages renewed interest in the Blue Lodge Field, its activities and attendance. While it is not and makes no claim to be a part of Symbolic Craft Masonry, we ever bear in mind that our membership is composed entirely of Master Masons.

The ritual is original and unique. The spectacular ceremonial requires a cast of thirty (30) or more and offers unlimited opportunities in stage activities and stunt performance. Its proper rendition requires a large stage, elaborate costumes, and stage settings. It is mysterious, startling and spectacular with a Persian atmosphere. While pervaded with a spirit of wholesome fun, it teaches a serious lesson which lingers with the initiate, instilling in him a spirit of optimism, a kindly feeling for his brother man, and an impression of GOOD FELLOWSHIP, which is something devoutly to be desired.

That the Grotto occupies a legitimate place and is doing a wonderful work cannot be denied. It extends the hand of Good Fellowship to all Master Masons, having a smile for all and a frown for none.

 


Related Organizations Allowing Women to be Members:

The Order of the Eastern Star


The Order of the Eastern Star is the largest fraternal organization, for men and women, in the world. Started in the mid-1800s, today there are over two million members worldwide.

Membership in the Eastern Star is open to women who are related to Master Masons. The members of the Eastern Star are dedicated men and women who sincerely reflect the spirit of fraternal love and the desire to work together for good. The moral and social purposes of the order are designed to build character, to promote friendship and harmony among members, and to practice charity

 


Daughters of the Nile

Formed in 1913, The Daughters of the Nile is an international, non-profit organization, comprised of women who are wives, widows, mothers, sisters or daughters of men who are Shriners. The purpose of the order is to assist the Shriners with their charitable work; to promote social, friendly fellowship within the order; and to advance and elevate the standard of Womanhood. The Order has grown to 148 Temples within United States and Canada, with approximately 75,000 members.

 

 

 


The Order of the Amaranth


The Order of the Amaranth is a fraternal organization composed of Master Masons and their properly qualified female relatives. In its teachings, the members are emphatically reminded of their duties to God, to their country and to their fellow beings. They are urged to portray, by precept and example, their belief in the "Golden Rule" and by conforming to the virtues inherent in Truth, Faith, Wisdom and Charity they can prove to others the goodness promulgated by the Order. The extent of its charitable work and overall benevolence is limited only by the opportunities that exist and the ability to secure adequate funding. Its philanthropic project is the Amaranth Diabetes Foundation.

 

 


Related Organizations for Children:

DeMolay


DeMolay is an organization dedicated to preparing young men to lead successful, happy, and productive lives. Basing its approach on timeless principles and practical, hands-on experience, DeMolay opens doors for young men aged 12 to 21 by developing the civic awareness, personal responsibility and leadership skills so vitally needed in society today. DeMolay combines this serious mission with a fun approach that builds important bonds of friendship among members in more than 1,000 chapters worldwide.

DeMolay alumni include Walt Disney, John Wayne, Walter Cronkite, football Hall-of-Famer Fran Tarkington, legendary Nebraska football coach Tom Osborne, news anchor David Goodnow and many others. Each has spoken eloquently of the life-changing benefit gained from their involvement in DeMolay.

To get more information about DeMolay follow the links to:

DeMolay International

Minnesota DeMolay

The Story of Jacques DeMolay

The namesake of the Order of DeMolay was born in Vitrey, Department of Haute Saone, France in the year 1244. At the age of 21, DeMolay joined the Order of Knights Templar.

The Knights Templar was an organization sanctioned by the Roman Catholic Church in 1128 to guard the road between Jerusalem and Acre, an important port city on the Mediterranean Sea. The Order of Knights Templar participated in the Crusades and earned a name for valor and heroism.

With many nobles and princes sending their sons to join the Knights Templar, the Order also became very wealthy and popular throughout Europe.

In 1298, Jacques DeMolay was named Grand Master of the Knights Templar, a position of power and prestige. As Grand Master however, Jacques DeMolay was also in a difficult position. The Crusades were not achieving their goals. The non-Christian Saracens defeated the Crusaders in battle and captured many vital cities and posts. The Knights Templar and the Hospitalers (another Order of Knights) were the only groups remaining to confront the Saracens.

The Knights Templar decided to reorganize and regain their strength. They traveled to the island of Cyprus, waiting for the general public to rise up in support of another Crusade.

Instead of public support, however, the Knights attracted the attention of powerful lords, who were interested in obtaining their wealth and power. In 1305, Philip the Fair, King of France, set about to obtain control of the Knights Templars. They had been accountable only to the Church. To prevent a rise in the power of the Church, and to increase his own wealth, Philip set out to take over the Knights.

The year 1307 saw the beginning of the persecution of the Knights. Jacques DeMolay, along with hundreds of others, were seized and thrown into dungeons. For seven years, DeMolay and the Knights suffered torture and inhuman conditions. While the Knights did not end, Philip managed to force Pope Clement to condemn the Templars. Their wealth and property were confiscated and given to Philip's supporters.

During years of torture, Jacques DeMolay continued to be loyal to his friends and Knights. He refused to disclose the location of the funds of the Order and he refused to betray his comrades. On March 18, 1314, DeMolay was tried by a special court. As evidence, the court depended on a forged confession, allegedly signed by DeMolay.

Jacques DeMolay disavowed the forged confession. Under the laws of the time, the disavowal of a confession was punishable by death. Another Knight, Guy of Auvergne, likewise disavowed his confession and stood with Jacques DeMolay.

King Philip ordered them both to be burned at the stake that day, and thus the story of Jacques DeMolay became a testimonial to loyalty and friendship.


Jobs Daughters


What follows is a brief overview of the Job's Daughters' organization. Much greater detail on current activities and programs can be found on the Minnesota Job's Daughters' website.

Job's Daughters is an organization for young women ages 10 - 20. Each local group is called a Bethel (chapter). The members elect the top five officers and the remaining officers are appointed. Each corps of officers serves for six months. 
The organization is based on the teachings of the book of Job, 42nd Chapter, 15th verse, 
"In all the land were no women found as fair as the daughters of Job, and their father gave them inheritance among their brethren". 
The organization provides a safe place for: social enjoyment; community service; planning and organizing various events; developing leadership and social skills; and training in financial planning and budgeting. 
Opportunities for travel and making life-long friends are only a small part of membership in this international organization.

What Do We Do?

Each Bethel holds meetings, fun events, service projects, fund raising ventures and various other activities as they determine. 
In Minnesota there are several statewide events that offer a wide variety of activities. Sports are a main attraction at the annual camp session in August. (See Camp page). 
Competitions in Performing Arts and Ritual are held in the fall along with the selection of the Miss Minnesota Job's Daughter and different theme events each year. (See Fall-Inn page.)

The spring brings the annual meeting and selection of new state officers for the Daughters and includes competition in Arts & Crafts, Sewing, Scrapbooks, Baking and Writing. (See Grand Bethel page).

During the summer a social event is held to bring all together; a picnic, trip to Valleyfair (amusement park) or to a lake or water park.

As an international organization, we have a special project we work for. It is the H.I.K.E. Fund - Hearing Impaired Kids Endowment Fund. This fund provides, at no cost to the recipient, hearing devices to make life better for children. (See Philanthropic page). In addition to that, Minnesota and each individual Bethel have their own special projects to help the community. These could be service projects or fund-raising efforts. 
We are here to help others, learn life skills, make lasting friendships, enjoy what we do and gain a lifetime of great memories.

What Can Parents/Guardians And Other Adults Do?

The adults in each Bethel help the Daughters to plan all events and advise them in all aspects of making successful events. (See Bethel Guardian Council page). The adults meet statewide in June to work and plan the state and promotional events for the Daughters. (See Grand Guardian Council page). 
Another group of adults are the Majority Members, members who have reached the age of 20 or who have married before that age. Majority Members also serve on Bethel Guardian Councils, and may be a part the Alumni Organizations. (See Alumni page.)

The International Organization

Once a year the Supreme Guardian Council Session is held. Daughters and adults come from all international locations and join in many events; meetings, meals, competitions, tours, picnics, leadership training, planning, formal presentations and ceremonies and just plain fun. Great friendships are formed and it is great to see old friends and make new ones each year. (See Supreme Guardian Council page.)

How Can I Join?

Eligibility to join - (C-BETHEL 1, Article IV, Section 1 (a), Constitution, Job's Daughters International). 
(a) Girls between the ages of ten (10) and twenty (20) years who bear a Masonic relationship shall be eligible for membership. Masonic relationship shall be interpreted to mean a relationship by blood, marriage or law to a: 
(1) Master Mason, 
(2) his wife or widow, 
(3) a member of Job's Daughters, 
(4) or a Majority Member of Job's Daughters. 
To obtain more information or a petition for membership, please contact the Grand Guardian or Grand Secretary at jdiggcmn @yahoo.com. When the petition is filled out, it needs to be sent, along with the initiation fee, to the Bethel Guardian of the Bethel you wish to join. (See Bethel Locations page.)

Visit all of our pages to see the wide variety of activities we are involved in.

 

Grand Guardian Council Of Minnesota Mission Statement

 

To promote the welfare and prosperity of Job’s Daughters and to encourage the practice of life’s lessons as related in the story of Job.

Our Vision

In our Vision – Membership provides a safe haven to Job’s Daughters, where they may find acceptance and develop lifelong friendships.

In our Vision – Opportunities enable Daughters to develop life skills in leadership, team work, patriotism, social awareness, self-worth, integrity and interaction with people of all ages.

In our Vision – Life experiences passed on by adults, who are a continuing asset, enrich and enlighten the Daughters and other adults.

In our Vision – Understanding of Freemasonry, continually promoted by Master Masons, provides the Daughters and other Job’s Daughters adults with a fuller understanding and appreciation of their Masonic heritage.

There are Bethels of Job's Daughters in the United States, Canada, Australia, Philippines and Brazil. Adults are a very important in our organization as they serve as advisors and chaperones for all events in Job's Daughters.

 


Rainbow Girls


Rainbow is a non-profit, service-oriented organization that teaches girls three basic virtues: Faith in a Supreme Being and other people, having Hope in all that they do, and Charity toward others.

The seven colors of the Rainbow represent seven teaching that each member receives on her journey toward the pot of gold.

In Minnesota the Rainbow organization shares a web site with Iowa.  Follow this link to the Rainbow for further information:

Minnesota Rainbow or visit the International Order of Rainbow for Girls website.

History

The International Order of the Rainbow for Girls was founded in 1922, by William Mark Sexson, a Christian minister and active member of the Masonic Lodge. The Rev. Sexson had spent his life dedicated to both fraternal organizations, and his ministry, and became aware of the need for a youth organization for young women who were from a Masonic or Eastern Star home. Today, membership is open to any girl regardless of Masonic affiliation.

Rainbow helps prepare today's young women to be tomorrow's leaders. Former Rainbow girls include Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Conner; astronaut Dorothy "Dottie" Metcalf-Lindenburger; actresses Lee Meriwether, Ruth Buzzy, and Dawn Wells; Bobbie Shunk Gaunt, first woman president and CEO of Ford Motor Co. of Canada; State Senator Carol Hudkins; and US Senator Olympia J. Snowe, just to name a few.

Masonic Roots / W. M. Sexson

W. Mark Sexson, the founder of the International Order of Rainbow for Girls, was a Christian minister, and active member of the Masonic Lodge. He initially founded Rainbow for young women that were from a Masonic or Eastern Star home. The teachings that he wrote in the Rainbow Ritual are based on Christian scriptures and teachings, as his experience in the ministry gave him insight into the lessons that would be most meaningful and important to youth.

In the book of Genesis, after the flood, God made a covenant with people that He would never again destroy the earth, and placed a Rainbow in the heavens as a symbol of that covenant. The Rev. Sexson believed that this symbol of God's love was an appropriate symbol for the Order, so the Rainbow and its colors provided the inspirations for both The International Order of Rainbow for Girls and for the lessons that are taught in the ceremonies of the Order. Rainbow Assemblies are sponsored by fraternal organizations such as the Masonic Lodge, Order of the Eastern Star, Order of the Amaranth, White Shrine of Jerusalem, or Clubs comprised of members of these organizations and Majority Members of Rainbow (our Alumni).

The Sponsoring Body selects those who will serve for one year on the Advisory Board. The Advisory Board is comprised of Majority Members, Master Masons, Eastern Stars, Amaranth, White Shrine of Jerusalem, and member’s Parents, Grandparents, and Legal Guardians. These adults have a deep interest in helping young people, are respected leaders, and provide the core of the directly involved adult leadership.

A Mother Advisor is selected from among the members of the Advisory Board. This is a woman chosen because she can inspire the girls of her Assembly. She works hand-in-hand with the girls and allows them to preside over the affairs of the Assembly with her direction.

The Assembly is comprised of 20 offices, which are occupied by the Rainbow Girls. An Installation of these offices occurs every 4 to 6 months and is open for all to attend. Therefore, girls are given the opportunity to fill many different positions in a short period of time.

Within these 20 offices are 7 that are elected by the girls and 13 that are appointed by the Worthy Advisor with the assistance of the Mother Advisor. The youth leader is called the “Worthy Advisor” who presides over the meetings and workings of the Assembly. A girl may wish to advance through the elected offices and eventually become the Worthy Advisor.
Each Jurisdiction (a state or geographic region) has its own business to conduct. These affairs are under the direction of a Chief Executive Officer, the Supreme Inspector or Deputy of that Jurisdiction, who works with the Grand Executive Committee of that Jurisdiction to conduct all business including preparations for the annual Grand Assembly Sessions. Grand Assembly meetings are led by a corps of Grand Officers who are selected according to the By-Laws of each Jurisdiction.
Internationally, Rainbow is guided by a group of ladies and gentlemen who make up the House of Gold. This prestigious group of inspirational leaders is directed by the Supreme Worthy Advisor. Every two years a Supreme Assembly is held. All Jurisdictions are encouraged to attend this international convention.

The Rainbow Supreme Temple is located in McAlester, Oklahoma. This lovely building houses the offices of the Supreme Assembly, and contains Rainbow treasures from around the world. Any Assembly paraphernalia or supplies can be ordered from the Supreme Temple.

Organization

Rainbow Assemblies are sponsored by fraternal organizations such as the Masonic Lodge, Order of the Eastern Star, Order of the Amaranth, White Shrine of Jerusalem, or Clubs comprised of members of these organizations and Majority Members of Rainbow (our Alumni).

The Sponsoring Body selects those who will serve for one year on the Advisory Board. The Advisory Board is comprised of Majority Members, Master Masons, Eastern Stars, Amaranth, White Shrine of Jerusalem, and members' Parents, Grandparents, and Legal Guardians. These adults have a deep interest in helping young people, are respected leaders, and provide the core of the directly involved adult leadership.

A Mother Advisor is selected from among the members of the Advisory Board. This is a woman chosen because she can inspire the girls of her Assembly. She works hand-in-hand with the girls and allows them to preside over the affairs of the Assembly with her direction.

The Assembly is comprised of 20 offices, which are occupied by the Rainbow Girls. An Installation of these officers occurs every 4 to 6 months and is open for all to attend. Therefore, girls are given the opportunity to fill many different positions in a short period of time.

Within these 20 offices are 7 that are elected by the girls and 13 that are appointed by the Worthy Advisor with the assistance of the Mother Advisor. The girls elect their leader, who is called the Worthy Advisor. She presides over the meetings and workings of the Assembly. A girl may wish to advance through the elected "line" offices and eventually become the Worthy Advisor. Each Jurisdiction (a state, province, country, or geographic region) has its own business to conduct. These affairs are under the direction of a Chief Executive Officer, the Supreme Inspector or Deputy of that Jurisdiction, who works with the Grand Executive Committee of that Jurisdiction to conduct all business including preparations for the annual Grand Assembly Sessions. Grand Assembly meetings are led by a corps of Grand Officers who are selected according to the By-Laws of each Jurisdiction. Internationally, Rainbow is guided by a group of ladies and gentlemen who make up the House of Gold. This prestigious group of inspirational leaders is directed by the Supreme Worthy Advisor. Every two years a Supreme Assembly is held. All Jurisdictions are encouraged to attend this international convention.

 

The Rainbow Supreme Temple is located in McAlester, Oklahoma. This lovely building houses the offices of the Supreme Assembly, and contains Rainbow treasures from around the world. Any Assembly paraphernalia or supplies can be ordered from the Supreme Temple.